Cue Advice

You’re looking for a new cue ?
Here is some advice to help you decide what’s best

There are countless players looking for new cues every day. For some it’s easy but for others it seems a near impossible task!
If that is you it’s important that you read the content below.
The good news is the brands we sell are well established and have great reputations for consistently making excellent cues. When choosing a cue from our website you know you’re buying quality.
You can be safe in the knowledge that Maximus, Ton Praram III, GBL & Mastercues are all used by professional players.

General Cue Advice

  • 1 pc or 3/4 jointed –  A cue with a well fitted 3/4 joint can play just as well as a 1 pc, it’s also much easier to transport and carry.
    Some players say they prefer the balance and feel a 1 pc cue provides.
    Most professional players these days tend to choose 1 pc, some still use jointed cues but they aren’t as popular. All things considered it’s personal preference.
  • Ash or Maple? – Ash is by far the most popular wood for snooker and English pool cues. Maple is denser than ash and does not have the pronounced visual grain of ash. The enhanced grain of ash cues is used by many players as a visual aid to aim and get a sense of movement of the cue, this can be distracting for some players so maple will be the better option. I personally prefer ash, I use the arrows/chevrons in the grain to aim, I have no direction with maple, it’s personal preference. Both types of wood are suitable for cues and play well.

Cue Size Guide

Tip size – Most used 9.25mm – 9.75mm with 9.5mm being preferred by many.
To give an idea of tip size differences – 0.10mm is the thickness of a piece of paper.

  • Under 9mm isn’t really suitable for snooker but is more suitable for English pool
    Why isn’t it suitable for snooker – The smaller the tip the more you will be punished for inaccuracy, also some cues can lack strength and power at this tip size.
  • 9.25mm – 9.8mm – This is probably the most common tip size bracket. 9.5mm being the most popular when buying a new cue. 9.5mm is ideal, it’s proved to be the most suitable size for keeping an accuracy while being able to generate good spin.
  • 9.9mm & 10mm – Are not always the best size to play with. There is a point a tip size becomes a little too big to generate good spin, in fairness good technique will overcome this. For the majority of players a big tip will encourage them to strike the cue ball harder to get a desired reaction. Big tips can create more push / throw / deflection when striking off center.

Choosing a tip size is a personal preference. There is no wrong or right, it’s what works best for you that counts.
*Please note choosing a tip size that has to be an exact size is extreme,
a tenth of a millimetre under or over size your ideal size will not make any difference to how the cue plays or feels. Remember it’s the thickness of a piece of paper.

Something to check – Players with a cue for a number of years could be  using near 9mm or even less without knowing, the cause is usually a combination of re-tipping and constant cleaning of the ferrule using an abrasive paper.


Weight – Most used 18oz – 19oz with 18oz – 18.5oz being the most popular
To give an idea of weight differences – A block of chalk weighs 0.6oz

  • 17.5oz or less – This isn’t ideal for snooker ( Great for English Pool ) a lack of weight in a cue isn’t helpful when trying to generate power, also straight forward shots can become an effort. Very few cues will play well on a snooker table at this weight or less.
  • 17.6 – 18.5oz – This weight bracket is very popular especially with a 1 pc cues. A good weight to generate power but is also light enough to give touch and feel.
  • 18.5oz – 19oz – This weight bracket is popular with players who like to feel some weight in a cue, cues near 19oz generally feel quite heavy in the hand. Personally I prefer to keep near to 18oz, I feel 19oz is just a little too heavy for myself, I lose a bit of touch and feel, and will sometimes generate to much reaction because of the extra weight. I mention this because this is very common.
  • 19oz and over – These are heavy cues for snooker, not ideal. Admittedly there are some players who feel the benefit of a heavy cue. Trial and error required for that one.

Choosing a preferred weight is personal preference. Again there is no wrong or right, it’s what works best for you that counts.
*Please note when choosing a weight that has to be exact is extreme, 0.2oz under or over
your ideal weight will not make any real noticabale difference to how the cue plays or feels. Remember it’s a third of a block of chalk.

Length – Most players use 57″- 59″ with 58″ being the most popular.

This can only be a rough guide to length, the reason being it’s not just height that has to be taken into consideration to find a suitable length of cue. We all have different body frames ! Skinny, big , long arms, short arms I could go on but I guess you’ve got the idea.
Technique / stance also is a factor.
The golden rule is never use a cue that is too short, this will stop you giving a correct delivery through the cue ball and hinder what you can do on the table. The good news is you will know when a cue is too long for you !
It’s not good to hold the cue right at the end, most players hold roughly 1″ – 2″ down. This extra length enables players to lengthen up their technique to play power shots, it’s also very helpful when stretching to play shots just out of reach.

  • Rough Guide Length
    Players less than 5ft 6″
    will be comfortable with cues 56″ most popular is still 57″. 58″ can feel too long.
    Players 5ft 7″ – 5ft – 9″ will be comfortable with 57″ &  58″ will be fine. Players this height using 58″ will often have 2″ – 3 ” spare at the back of the cue but will be comfortable with the balance of the cue.
  • 5ft 10″ – 6ft 2″ Not many players this height get away with a 57″.
    58″ is the most suitable for players in this height bracket, some players feel more suited to a 59″ cue when over 6ft.
    6ft 3″ – 6ft 6″ There are players at this height who use and play very well with 58″, I’d recommend to go to 59″ or even longer if required.
    The longest cue we’ve had made was 63″ for a gentleman that was 6ft 9″

How to check what cue length is suitable
Take up stance as if you were about to play a shot.
Make sure your cueing forearm is vertical /90 deg to floor.
Tip of your cue nearly touching the cue ball, cue ball distance should be about 12” to the vee of your bridge hand. This will ensure you have enough length for a full cue action. Ideally you require about 1” of spare cue past your grip hand so you can lengthen up your stance for power shots.
The 12” measurement for bridge distance isn’t set in stone as some players prefer it to be longer or shorter. This information will give you a good indication to how long your cue needs to be.

Butt Diameter – This is the measurement across the very end of the butt from side to side.  Standard butt diameters are between 29mm – 30mm this suits most players.

  • Guide to help you
    27mm – 28mm is thin – Very few players have this size
    28mm to 29mm is slim – Popular with English pool players
    29mm to 30mm is Standard – At least 80% of players will use butt diameters in this size bracket.
    30mm – 31mm is thick – Not many players like over 30mm
    32mm is extremely thick – Very rare, I can only remember ordering 1 cue at 32mm or thicker in the last 20 years !

Balancing Point – This is the position the cue balances at when horizontal.

This will determine how a cue feels in your hands. Some players prefer a rear weighted cue while others like the weight to feel further forward. Like so many things about a cue it’s a personal preference. Lots of things can influence a balancing point, joints, natural densities of woods, shaft and butt size and tapers. It’s all very subjective.

  • Going from experience I’d say that most cues tend to play and feel well balanced when between 17″ – 18.5″
    Cues with a balancing point of less than 17″ can start to feel butt heavy and light on your bridge hand.

The problem with balancing points is sometimes they can be misleading, but as a rule if you like a butt heavy cue / weight in your hand stay around 17″ or less, if you prefer a more evenly balanced cue / forward weighted go for around 18″ or more.

I hope you’ve taken the time to read the above information, hopefully this will give you some help and guidence to finding a suitable cue. Specifications are more about size and comfort that are personal to you, taking into consideration what specifications are the safest / best to use for playability.

Also here is an example for you to think about.  Why it’s so difficult to replace your old faithful cue ?
We once had 8 cues made to the same design, with exactly the same specifications. I’m guessing you might be thinking well they will all be the same !
Design and specifications say they were but interms of how they felt and played it could not be further from the truth.
A few of them were similar in how they played and felt, but most of them were very different, even though they were all 18oz some felt lighter or heavier than others.
– Weight distribution through the cue causes this, varying weight of the wood –
Tip sizes were all 9.5mm but when playing with the cues some seemed thicker and thinner than each other
– Grain pattern can cause this illusion –
Some cues felt longer and shorter than each other even though they were all 58″.
These are just some of the reasons why having a cue to made to your exact specifications doesn’t mean that cue will be right for you.

In depth !

Why is it so difficult for me to settle with a new cue ?
It comes down to a combination of experience & expectation.

  • Less experience less expectation –  A good quality cue will be suitable for most novice / intermediate standard players. A little time to work out what specifications will be best for them is well worth the effort, contact us if you need any help with this.

The most common specifications players choose are tip size around 9.5mm, standard length 58″, weight between 18 – 19oz. For most players keeping to these specifications will do the job fine.

  • More experience more expectation – This is where it gets difficult !
    There is a knowledge that has been acquired over years of playing, this has given an understanding & expectation of how you want a cue to feel and play.
    To make things more difficult, some players want to instantly play better with a new cue !
    Every cue plays differently, no 2 shafts are the same. It takes time to get to know how the cue will play and react, this fine tuning of shots with a new cue is when a player will decide if the cue is or isn’t suitable for them.
    The fact is the better you get the harder it becomes to find a suitable cue.
    Every cue is different in terms of feel and play-ability. Being able to adapt and compensate, some players do this well some don’t. To find a cue that you can settle with is priceless.

If you are struggling to find a suitable playing cue after several attempts my advice to you is to visit us, we have probably the best selection of cues in the country in our showroom.
You can compare and test cues out to find what feels and plays well. Our experience is that players often have fixed ideas on what they want in terms of specifications and design, the opportunity to try different cues often ends up with players finding a cue they love, with specifications they would never have considered without trying.
We are available to help and give advice when required.

How a cue plays with off centre striking – Deflection
I believe deflection is probably one of the most contributing factors to why players can or can’t get on with a new cue.

When a player is looking for a new cue they generally have an idea of design, size, length and weight but deflection is never mentioned.
Stiffness of shaft is brought up by some players, but that doesn’t always give a true indication to how the cue will play. Players with knowledge about cues will have learned that a cue with a stiff shaft will create less deflection, or that is what they are led to believe, the fact is this can be inconsistent !
There are cues with stiff shafts that produce a lot of throw / deflection and cues with flex in the shaft that produce very little throw / push / deflection. A high percentage of cues with stiff shafts play well, they tend to keep the line of the shot better than shafts with more flex.

A cue with a lot of deflection is difficult to use, it’s less forgiving when accidentally striking the cue ball off the centre line. A cue with less deflection is easier to use, players can adapt quickly because it’s more forgiving when accidentally striking off the centre line.

How To Test Deflection
We do deflection tests on cues day in day out in the shop, this is to help give an indication of how the cue plays.
Test your own cues deflection to see how much throw / push / deflection your cue produces, you might be surprised !!
You can check your current cue to see how much deflection the cue is producing by placing the cue ball on the brown spot.  Address the cue ball to play down the line of the spots (brown to black). The cue ball should travel straight.  Now repeat this process using side spin (left or right). The amount that the cue ball curves away from the line of the spots indicates how much deflection that the cue has. The cue must be kept parallel to the centre line to avoid natural compensation but this may feel unnatural (I hope this makes sense).  When striking the cue ball keep your cue on the line of aim so you should finish your stroke tip towards the side of the black spot you’ve been addressing. The speed to play this stroke is lag pace, that means you want the cue ball to return to the baulk area. Repeat this a few times to check consistency.

Things to take into consideration when doing this – make sure you keep the same height / position when you strike through the cue ball. Height is very important, when striking below centre you create drag which lessens the deflection and creates pull, striking above centre will create slightly more deflection, so try and keep to central height for best results.
After doing this you will have had the chance to see how your cue is reacting using side and the deflection being created. This is one of the main reasons that players can or can’t get on with new cues. Players with experience have an expectation as to how they expect a cue to play when using side or shots at distance, any difference in deflection will be more noticeable.

A cue with a high of deflection is more difficult to play with. Although players will get used to them over time and learn to compensate for the deflection, this inevitably leads to a lack of consistency. I have found that very good players who use cues with a lot of deflection need to practice more regularly to keep their standard of play high and consistent. A cue with little deflection is easier to get used to. Players benefit from this because it can allow them to play without having to adjust so much from the line of a shot when using side spin.
Most cues will naturally create some deflection, about half a ball (the edge of the cue ball will go over the black spot) when doing the deflection test correctly.
Less than half a cue ball is good, very few cues produce no deflection.
The majority of players don’t strike through the centre of the cue ball when meaning to do so, having a cue with low deflection is forgiving as it reduces the effect of unintentional side.
Some of you are thinking that type of tip and shape of tip will have an influence.
Yes you are correct, ideally the tip fitted is well shaped (slight dome) and bedded in or at least firm.

The above information and advice was wrote by Stu Green